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  • Ready to pay $2.5m for the worlds most complex watch? : Jaeger LeCoultre Hybris Mechanica Grande Sonnerie

    June 19, 2009 | Posted by

    Jaeger LeCoultre presents to us another smashing timepiece. And if the image of this watch has already won your heart then think again, because this watch will cost you a staggering $2.5 million. That’s the price you pay for the “world’s most complex watch.” If you purchase the watch, Jaeger LeCoultre includes two of its other highly complex watches (the Gyrotourbillon and the Reverso a Tryptique watches) as part of a three watch set. The entire collection of three watches arrives in a full safe which is possibly the largest (and heaviest) watch presentation box to date.

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    The Hybris Mechanica Grande Sonnerie will hold the Jaeger LeCoultre mechanical Calibre 182 movement with 26 complications and over 1300 parts. All of that will be inside of the 18k white gold 44mm wide by 15mm thick case. I wonder how they are going to fit in the ultra complex movement and complex chiming and gongs mechanism into such a small space. I am starting to understand where the huge price comes into play. The last two “world’s most complex watches” were the Patek Philippe Calibre 89 which boasted 24 complications and cost $6 million, and the Franck Muller Aeternitas Mega that had 25 complications and cost (only) $1 million. Soon these watches will be supplanted by the Hybris Mechanica Grande Sonnerie. The collection of three watches that will come in the Hybris Mechanica set will together hold 55 complications. For the serious collector, and serious price of the watch, it is clear why they will be delivered in a safe.
    Many of the complications involve the sonnerie functions that include Westminster chimes (will be the only watch that can play the whole Westminster carillon melody), grande sonnerie, petit sonnerie, minute repeater, a silent mode, flying tourbillon, perpetual calendar with a retrograde day, date, and month indicator as well as a leap year indicator. The watch will of course have the time, with an instantaneous jumping hour display, as well as separate power reserve indicators for the mainspring power reserve as well as the power reserve for the sonnerie. The most impressing part is that despite the many complications, the watch still is able to have a large portion of the dial skeletonized and still be highly easy to read. And here comes the exclusivity of this impeccable watch in total, 30 sets of the three watches will be available.
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